The finalists in the 2016 Tusk Conservation Award winners have been chosen. We will be celebrating their incredible work on Wednesday 30th November in London where they will be presented with their awards by Sir David Attenborough.

For tickets please contact Tusk.

˅

Tusk Conservation Awards

Tusk has been working since 1990 to build a sustainable future for the people and the wildlife of the African continent.

These annual awards will highlight inspirational conservation work in Africa, ranging from the protection of endangered species and threatened habitat to the promotion of environmental education and the development of community driven conservation.

Watch video

About

The Tusk Conservation Awards have been developed by Tusk Trust in partnership with Investec Asset Management. The awards aim to highlight the outstanding achievements of individuals working within the field of conservation. From practical field conservation to successful environmental education, these awards aim to recognise the achievements of individuals who are ensuring the future of Africa and bringing the challenges faced by the continent to a global audience.

The Awards

The awards ceremony is hosted by BBC broadcaster and journalist, Kate Silverton, who is a patron of Tusk Trust. Three Tusk Awards will be presented in 2016.

The Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, supported by Investec Asset Management, is a lifetime achievement award, given to a distinguished individual for their outstanding dedication and exceptional contribution to conservation in Africa.  

The Tusk Conservation Award, supported by Land Rover, recognises an up-and-coming conservationist whose work has already demonstrated an exceptional commitment to conservation and has made a significant impact to date.

The Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award, recognises the dedication and bravery of rangers working to protect Africa’s increasingly endangered wildlife.

˅

Results

Follow Tusk and join the conversation using #TuskAwards.

View Archive

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa

Rachel McRobb

Rachel McRobb

Born in Zambia Rachel quickly fostered a love for the country’s rich wildlife and wild places. While working in the South Luangwa National Park she soon realized the numbers of animals getting caught, maimed and killed in poaching snares, particularly elephants, was unsustainable. Together with several stakeholders she co-founded an anti-poaching team. With virtually no experience, training or support, in the ensuing 11 years Rachel has successfully expanded the organization into what it is today, Conservation South Luangwa (CLS).

The locally run organisation employs community scouts from the surrounding chiefdoms and is one of the largest employers in the valley. It is now one of the most important and successful efforts in the region, playing a vital role in reducing elephant and other wildlife poaching and improving conservation efforts through a combination of community law enforcement, human elephant conflict mitigation, community engagement, research and planning.

Olivier Nsengimana

Olivier Nsengimana

Through his project Saving Endangered Grey Crowned Cranes, Olivier hopes to inspire the next generation of young Rwandans about the conservation of the country’s wildlife and natural heritage. The crowned crane, is the only species of crane found in Rwanda and is the country’s national bird. With only 300 – 500 individuals estimated to remain in the country, the trend follows the global population, which has seen a precipitous decline of over 78% in the last 45 years.

Olivier works as a field veterinarian with the gorilla doctors and as a scientist assessing disease links between humans and wildlife, but it is his commitment to the crane which has strengthened national pride in the conservation of this endangered species and of Rwanda’s wildlife in general. He has become a role model for the youth of Rwanda and an example of how with conviction and belief one person can help rebuild the belief in a country and its natural environment.  

Cathy Dreyer

Cathy Dreyer

Cathy Dreyer started her career over 17 years ago with South African National Parks, as a conservation student. During the course of her practical year she assisted with the capture and boma training of black rhino. This became a turning point in her life as she developed a deep, lifelong passion for black rhino, which has shaped her career in conservation.

Extensive work and experience with SAN Parks developed her reputation for installing effective systems and marked her out as an outstanding and committed conservationist. Recently Cathy was appointed Conservation Manager for a strategically significant reserve in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa and is now responsible for protecting one of the world’s most important black rhino populations.  

The winners of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa and the The Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award will be announced at the gala Awards ceremony on Wednesday 30th November 2016.

Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa

Garth Owen-Smith

Garth Owen-Smith

This year the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, sponsored by Investec Asset Management, was awarded to Garth Owen-Smith in recognition of his lifetime contribution alongside Dr. Margaret Jacobsohn to the restoration and conservation of wildlife in Namibia.

Garth and Margaret could together be described as the architects of community conservation and their combined efforts have positioned Namibia's approach to conservation as a model to be revered and emulated across Africa.  Together they founded Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC), which evolved out of their pioneering partnership with community leaders in the early 1980s to end the poaching and depredation that was taking place in the northwest of Namibia.

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa

Dr Emmanuel de Merode

Dr Emmanuel de Merode

This year, the Tusk Award that recognises an emerging leader in African conservation - sponsored by Land Rover - was presented to Dr Emmanuel de Merode for his commendable work in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Since it was designated a World Heritage Site in 1979, Virunga National Park has faced 25 years of civil war; a refugee crisis and numerous armed militia occupations - over 140 rangers have lost their lives there in the past 15 years. In 2008, when Emmanuel became Director, the threats to the park were unparalleled.  The National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) had taken control of the park and had evicted all of the park rangers. Despite these monumental obstructions, Emmanuel managed to negotiate with rebel leaders to allow his rangers to return to work, stopping the mass exploitation of the Park and ensuring the population of endangered mountain gorillas remains secure.

The Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award

Edward Ndiritu

Edward Ndiritu

HRH The Duke of Cambridge presented Edward Ndiritu with the inaugural Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award, for which he was selected because of his outstanding leadership and commitment in the face of the escalating threat from poachers in northern Kenya.

As Head of the Anti-Poaching Unit for the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT), Edward is responsible for the planning and implementation of security strategy for a pivotal wildlife conservation area. His security operation for NRT covers thirty-three community managed wildlife conservancies and approximately 9,500 migratory elephant, while Lewa is host to 13% of Kenya's entire black rhino population.

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa

Mr Cosmas Mumba (Zambia)

Mr Cosmas Mumba (Zambia)

Cosmas shows great passion and commitment in his work rescuing primates and through his dedication has personally developed an exemplary primate release programme.  Despite humble beginnings and a general lack of recognition, he has achieved remarkable success and progress in his chosen field. He is an unsung hero and serves as a role model to other indigenous African would-be conservationists

Dr Mary Molokwu (Liberia)

Dr Mary Molokwu (Liberia)

Mary has worked tirelessly in often difficult circumstances to successfully establish, develop and sustain academic forestry and conservation programmes for a wide community of students, professionals and international bodies in West Africa.

Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa

Richard Bonham

Richard Bonham

The prestigious Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, sponsored by Investec Asset Management, was given to Richard Bonham in recognition of his lifetime contribution to wildlife and the Maasai community in Kenya.

Kenya’s Mbirikani Group Ranch is one of the most beautiful places on earth: a quarter of a million acres of unfenced savannah lying between the snows of Kilimanjaro and the cloud forest summits of the Chyulu Hills. Ten thousand Maasai pastoralists live here alongside elephants, lions and other plains game, and for the past 20 years it has also been the home of one of Africa’s most highly respected conservationists.

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa

Herizo Andrianandrasana

Herizo Andrianandrasana

The Tusk Award for emerging leaders in conservation – an award sponsored by Land Rover – was presented to Herizo Andrianandrasana, from Madagascar.

Herizo is a driving force behind integrating local people into conservation management and monitoring in Madagascar. Madagascar remains in the midst of an environmental crisis. In one of the poorest countries in the world, with few livelihood options and low capacity for enforcing environmental protection, community-based conservation is seen as a sustainable solution.

Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa

Clive Stockil

Clive Stockil

The Prince William Award, sponsored by Investec Asset Management, was presented to  CLIVE STOCKIL for his groundbreaking work as one of Africa’s great conservation pioneers – a man who recognised four decades ago the critical need to engage local communities in conservation and deliver tangible benefits to ordinary people living alongside wildlife.  In 1992, Stockil was also the driving force behind the creation of Africa’s then largest private conservancy in the Savé Valley, Zimbabwe, which is now home to one of the country’s largest rhino populations.

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa

Tom Lalampaa

Tom Lalampaa

WINNER

TOM LALAMPAA was presented with the Tusk Award for his outstanding work brokering peace through conservation amongst feuding tribal groups in northern Kenya. Lalampaa has been key to creating a conservation area of 3 million acres under the Northern Rangelands Trust, benefiting over 150,000 people.  The NRT is recognized as the leading model for community conservation in Kenya – and increasingly across Africa – with a proven impact on peace, livelihoods and conservation.  The Tusk Award was sponsored by Land Rover.

Dr Alasdair Harris

Dr Alasdair Harris

HIGHLY COMMENDED

DR ALASDAIR HARRIS received a Highly Commended prize from The Duke for his work with communities along the Madagascar coast, as founder and research director of Blue Ventures Conservation. Harris’s initiatives protect marine biodiversity and safeguard traditional coastal livelihoods, creating a thriving new marine conservation movement in the region.

˅

Judging panel

Our judging panel features some of the leading figures in conservation in Africa today, all of whom are deeply passionate about the plights the continent faces.

Ali Kaka

Ali Kaka

Ali studied at the University of Colorado (Boulder) and Colorado State University, Fort Collins in the USA, majoring in Biology/Zoology and Captive Wildlife Management.

In 1977, he joined the Kenya Wildlife Services as a Research Assistant and later earned the title of Senior Assistant Director supervising all Regions. In 1998 Ali was awarded the Kenya Order of the Grand Warrior for achievements in anti-poaching, rhino capture and intelligence work.

In 2001 Ali left the Kenya Wildlife Service and joined the East African Wild Life Society (EAWLS) as the Executive Director.

From 2009 to present, Ali has worked with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as the Regional Director for Eastern and Southern Africa. Ali also served as Vice Chair of IUCN-WCPA (World Commission on Protected Areas), eastern Africa, as well as serving on a number of local Conservancy Boards and as a member of Kenya Ministerial Advisory Committees.

In 2004 Ali received the National Geographic Society’s Howard Buffet Award for ‘Leadership in African Conservation’ and received the Meritorious award from IUCN – World Commission On Protected Areas in 2009.

Simon King OBE

Simon King OBE

Simon, who was born in Kenya, has been working as a national history documentarian for over 30 years – during this time he has gained a wealth of experience in filming wildlife from around the globe.  

He has filmed and co-presented the long-running BBC One series Big Cat Diary alongside Jonathan Scott and Saba Douglas-Hamilton, which follows the progress of lions, leopards and cheetahs in the Masai Mara Game Reserve, Kenya. He also co-presents BBC Two’s annual Springwatch and Autumnwatch series.  

Simon’s recent film projects include principal camera credits for Wild Africa and The Blue Planet. He has won BAFTA awards for his camerawork on Life in the Freezer and Planet Earth, for which he filmed a celebrated slow-motion sequence of a great white shark leaping out of the water to catch a cape fur seal.  

In November 2010, Simon was appointed President of The Wildlife Trusts. There are 47 local Wildlife Trusts across the whole of the UK with just under 1,000,000 members. They are working for an environment rich in wildlife for everyone, and at 47 Simon is the youngest President in the organisation’s 98 year history.

Dr. Karen Ross

Dr. Karen Ross

Karen has a doctorate in wildlife ecology from Edinburgh University and has spent most of her life working in Africa, mainly in the Okavango Delta.  

Author of Okavango: Jewel of the Kalahari, her book was first published as a companion to a three part BBC documentary series of the same title, produced by Partridge Films and winner of the 1988 Golden Panda, for which she was researcher and writer.  

Staying on in Botswana, she founded Conservation International’s programme there in 1992 and directed it for ten years, living under canvas and raising her daughter Lena Rae near Maun. For 25 years Karen pursued conservation goals in the Okavango Delta and was part of numerous critical conservation activities in Botswana. These included protection of the Okavango Delta from mining threats from upstream water withdrawals and from cattle veterinary fences being built in the wilderness surrounding the delta.  

For the past five years she has represented the Wilderness/WILD Foundations and Deutsche Umwelthilfe (BMZ) in collaboration with the Government of Botswana, Okavango communities and numerous stakeholders to motivate for the listing of the Okavango Delta as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Okavango Delta Nomination Dossier was submitted to UNESCO in 2011.

Nigel Winser

Nigel Winser

Nigel joined Earthwatch in July 2005 and was appointed Executive Vice President in 2008. Prior to that he was the Deputy Director and Head of the Expeditions and Fieldwork Division at the Royal Geographical Society in London.

Winser trained as a Life Scientist at Westminster University where he gained international field experience as an undergraduate. He first joined the Royal Geographical Society as a Deputy Field Director in 1976 for the society’s Gunung Mulu project in Sarawak. He helped establish the society’s Expedition Advisory Centre and was then selected to develop its international field research programmes in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Australia and the Indian Ocean.  

For his services to fieldwork, notably in Oman, he was awarded the Patron’s Gold Medal of the Society in 1988 and the Mungo Park Award of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. In 1991 he was appointed Deputy Director, becoming responsible for a wide range of programmes and society activities. As Head of the Expeditions and Fieldwork division, Nigel was involved in developing standards and training for safe fieldwork and promoting the value of outdoor learning. Nigel has been on the board of several geographical and conservation bodies, including the IUCN UK committee, the UK Man and the Biosphere committee, the Mount Everest Foundation, the British Airways Tourism for Tomorrow committee, Friends of Conservation (Chair), the Field Studies Council and the Global Canopy Programme.  

Nigel’s principal expertise lies with interdisciplinary and international purpose-led fieldwork, community based nature conservation approaches, and corporate engagement with environmental issues. Nigel was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from Westminster University for his services to the environment and conservation.

Dr. Rob Brett

Dr. Rob Brett

Dr Rob Brett has been Director of FFI’s Africa & Madagascar Programme since 2006, overseeing ca. 40 projects in 14 countries. After reading Zoology at Oxford, Rob studied the behavioural ecology of naked mole-rats in Tsavo NP for his doctorate, but has been a rhino conservation specialist since 1986 and a member of IUCN’s African Rhino Specialist Group for the past 20 years. He has served on the senior staff of two wildlife authorities, as national Rhino Coordinator in the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS: 1989-95) where he was responsible for the development and stocking of several of Kenya’s successful rhino sanctuaries, and as Senior Wildlife Biologist in the Botswana Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP: 2000-01), and has also lived and worked in Namibia and Zimbabwe. Before joining FFI in 2004, Rob coordinated a regional programme for rhino conservation in ten southern African countries under the umbrella of the Southern African Development Community (SADC).

Charlie Mayhew MBE

Charlie Mayhew MBE

Charlie Mayhew began his working life in 1981 as a Marine Insurance Broker at Lloyds of London with Dumas Ltd. In 1984 he persuaded Willis Faber to sponsor him to organize a major expedition across Africa as part of the UN’s International Year of Youth. After 18 months of planning, the 33 strong team led by Mayhew departed London bound for Africa and with the personal backing of the then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.

On his return from Africa, Charlie was elected a Fellow of The Royal Geographical Society and made a member of the Scientific Exploration Society. 

In 1988, Charlie formed an independent financial service business and in 1990 he co-founded Tusk Trust with the actor Timothy Ackroyd.  In collaboration with Ackroyd, he co-produced the feature film ‘Lost in Africa’, a drama produced to highlight the horrors of the ivory trade. In 2002, Charlie stepped down as a Trustee to become Tusk’s first Chief Executive. In recognition of his services to conservation in Africa, Charlie was awarded an MBE by Her Majesty The Queen in December 2005. 

Dr Susan Canney

Dr Susan Canney

Susan is a Research Associate within the University of Oxford’s Department of Zoology, specialising in conservation biology. She has worked on a variety of nature conservation projects in Africa, Asia and Europe, and is the General Adviser and Project Leader for the Tusk-supported Mali Elephant Project. Susan’s research looks at how people interact with wildlife and ecosystems, and how sustainable solutions can be found to conservation problems, such as human-wildlife conflict. Susan has been a Trustee of Tusk since December 2014. 
 

˅

Nominations

There are three annual Awards available which will recognise outstanding and inspirational achievements in the area of African wildlife conservation with a particular focus on the core objectives of Tusk’s holistic approach to conservation. The judges will assess nominee’s outstanding contribution towards any or all of the following areas: wildlife and habitat conservation, development and delivery of environmental education, and sustainable community development programmes designed to enhance conservation.

To submit a nomination, please complete the appropriate nomination form below and provide the additional support documents.

Please send the completed nomination pack to info@tuskawards.com no later than 3rd March 2016.

Please note the intention is that the winners of the Tusk Awards should have no knowledge of their nomination. Therefore, please ensure that the details of your nomination remain strictly confidential and that neither you nor the supporting referees reveal to your candidate that he / she is being considered for a Tusk Award.

Each nomination will be reviewed by the Tusk Conservation Awards Nomination Committee, who will then submit the finalists to the Judging Panel in Spring 2017. The identity of the award winners will be made public for the first time at the official award ceremony.

Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa
This is a lifetime achievement award thatrecognises outstanding dedication and exceptional contribution to conservation in Africa. This will only be awarded to someone who has over 25 years experience in the field. 

Download the Prince William Award pre nomination form here.

Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa
This award is for an individual who has been judged to be emerging as a leading conservationist, and recognisestheir outstanding contribution to conservation and considerable success shown in their chosen field. 

Download the Tusk Award pre nomination form here.

Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award
This award is to recognise the dedication and commitment of an individual who works in the field on a daily basis protecting Africa’s wildlife. A Wildlife Ranger refers to a person working in the field including game scouts, game guards, wildlife trackers, wildlife monitors - both uniformed and non-uniformed. 

Download the Wildlife Ranger Award pre nomination form here.

˅

Partners

The Tusk Conservation Awards are an initiative of Tusk Trust in partnership with Investec Asset Management. Additional sponsorship is provided by: Land Rover, sponsor of the Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa and vehicle support; British Airways for the award winners´ flights; the Mantis Group for hotel accommodation in London; Moët Hennessy for wine and champagne at the event; Tiffany & Co. for the design and production of the trophies.

Tusk
Tusk

Tusk

Twenty years ago Africa was in the midst of a poaching crisis. Tusk Trust was established in 1990 in response to an urgent need to halt the decline in Africa’s natural heritage and find a way to combine the interests of people and wildlife alike.

Tusk’s current portfolio of 58 field projects spread across 17 African countries is designed not only to protect wildlife, particularly endangered species, but also to help alleviate poverty and encourage sustainable development and education amongst many poor rural communities living alongside wildlife. The charity views conservation as a long term investment, working with key partners across the continent to implement holistic and sustainable conservation projects.  

It has been Tusk’s long-term ambition to create an awards programme to celebrate outstanding achievement in African conservation. The support of Investec Asset Management as the awards partner hasenabled Tusk to turn that vision into reality. 

Investec
Investec

Investec Asset Management

Investec Asset Management is a specialist provider of active investment products and services. Established in South Africa in 1991, the firm has been built from a small start-up into an international business managing approximately US$100 billion (as at end September 2012 ). Our clients include some of the world’s largest private and public sector pension funds and range from foundations, insurers and central banks to intermediated and direct investors.

The business has grown largely organically from domestic roots in Southern Africa to a position where we proudly serve a growing international client base from the Americas, the UK, Continental Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Australia and Africa. We employ 140 investment professionals.

The firm seeks to create a profitable partnership between clients, shareholders and employees and our aim is to exceed our clients’ investment and client service expectations and to manage their money to the highest possible standard. The firm is still managed by its founding members, representing continuity and stability throughout the firm’s successful growth.

“The mutual desire to contribute to the future of Africa aligns us with Tusk, which has been working for over two decades towards building a sustainable future for Africa’s natural heritage.

We care deeply about the continent of our origin and have supported Tusk for many years through a variety of African-based conservation initiatives. We applaud the Tusk team for their unfaltering work across the continent.”

Hendrik Du Toit, CEO, Award Partner Investec Asset Management 


Land Rover
Land Rover

Land Rover

Land Rover, a long standing corporate partner of the charity, have generously come on board as co-sponsors of the Tusk Award [PNG 15cm RGB LR Logo Oval (1) (1)] for Conservation in Africa.

Together, Land Rover and Tusk are working to enhance sustainable conservation across Africa.  For Land Rover, this includes vehicle support in the UK, USA and Kenya.  In addition to providing annual support to the Safaricom Marathon, Land Rover has recently supplied a long-wheel based Land Rover for the Tusk team in Kenya.

Avios
Avios

Avios

See www.avios.com for more information.

Mantis
Mantis

Mantis

Mantis is an iconic collection of hotels, founded by conservationist and businessman Adrian Gardiner.  From the outset, the group has aimed to provide outstanding service to guests whilst respecting the land, the community and the environment of each destination.  The Mantis Collection was spawned from Shamwari Game Reserve, the first of its kind in the Eastern Cape South Africa, where wild animals were re-introduced into the area to roam free, as they had done a century and more before, creating both an ecological balance and employment in a previously deprived area. The collection now spans all seven continents, where in increasing over-crowded and disrespectful environments, the exceptional is unearthed.

“Mantis is delighted and privileged to partner with the Tusk Conservation Awards.  The combined properties and conservation work of the Mantis group aim to give these Awards the voice they deserve.”

Moet & Chandon
Moet & Chandon

Moet & Chandon

Moët & Chandon is the Champagne of success and glamour since 1743.  Renowned for its achievements, firsts and legendary pioneering spirit, Moët & Chandon is the Maison that introduced Champagne to the world.  Synonymous with the most venerable of traditions and the most modern of pleasures, Moët & Chandon has celebrated life’s most triumphant moments with grandeur and generosity for over 270 years. 

Tiffany & co
Tiffany & co

Tiffany & Co.

For more than 175 years, Tiffany & Co. has built an international reputation as a premier jeweler, known for its exquisite diamonds. Founded in New York City in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, the legendary company prides itself on offering creative jewelry designs, superior craftsmanship and excellent customer service. Most importantly, Tiffany is associated with being the jeweller of romance and sentiment, helping people celebrate the special moments in their lives. The Tiffany design aesthetic has always derived its in inspiration from nature, so there is a strong company commitment to engaging in business practices that protect the earth’s beauty and resources. Preserving the environment is an imperative at Tiffany.  Every element of a Tiffany design – from the gemstones and silver used to how the company selects its partners around the globe – meets exacting standards that help preserve our planet and the natural wonders that comprise it. Tiffany takes a strong stand on responsible mining, working diligently to identify mines and country of origin of every diamond and gemstone.  Guided by the belief that a successful company has a responsibility to the greater community, Tiffany maintains a corporate giving program that supports non-profit organizations like Tusk that are dedicated to protecting nature and promoting the spirit of human innovation and creativity.


˅

View all

News

Saturday 25th June, 2016
Telegraph
Tusk Conservation Awards: 2015 Winners
Article Link

30th June 2016
MSN News
Article Link

Saturday 20th July 2016
The News Editor
Article Link

Friday 1st July 2016
NZ Herald
Article Link

Tuesday 24th November, 2015
Telegraph
Tusk Conservation Awards: 2015 Winners
Article Link

Tuesday 24th November, 2015 
Mail Online
Katherine Jenkins shows her support for the third annual Tusk Conservation Awards
Article Link

Friday, September 11th September 2015
Press Release
Tusk Announces Short List for 2015 Conservation Awards
More

Friday, July 31st, 2015
Press Release
Prince William praises winner of new Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award
More

˅ ˄

Contact

For nomination and general enquiries, please email us at info@tuskawards.com

Follow Tusk on Twitter & Facebook.

Join the conversation #TuskAwards.

UK Address

Tusk Trust

4 Cheapside House
High Street
Gillingham
Dorset SP8 4AA
T: +44 (0)1747 831 005

US Address

Tusk USA Inc.

525 East 89th Street
Courtyard Office,
New York, NY 10128
T: +1 212 602-1588

Press/Media Contact
For Press Enquiries please contact press@tuskawards.com

T: +44 (0)207 597 1834
+44 (0)1747 831 005

Royal Patron HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG KT

The Tusk Conservation Awards are an initiative of Tusk.

Tusk Trust - UK Registered Charity, No 803118

Tusk USA Inc - Registered 501(c)(3), EIN: 30-0190986

Back to top